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Archive for the ‘Data Center’ Category

August 31st, 2020

Arm processors in the Data Center

By Raghib Hussain, Chief Strategy Officer and Executive Vice President, Networking and Processors Group

Last week, Marvell announced a change in our strategy for ThunderX, our Arm-based server-class processor product line. I’d like to take the opportunity to put some more context around that announcement, and our future plans in the data center market.

ThunderX is a product line that we started at Cavium, prior to our merger with Marvell in 2018. At Cavium, we had built many generations of successful processors for infrastructure applications, including our Nitrox security processor and OCTEON infrastructure processor. These processors have been deployed in the world’s most demanding data-plane applications such as firewalls, routers, SSL-acceleration, cellular base stations, and Smart NICs. Today, OCTEON is the most scalable and widely deployed multicore processor in the market.

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August 27th, 2020

How to Reap the Benefits of NVMe over Fabric in 2020

By Todd Owens, Technical Marketing Manager, Marvell

As native Non-volatile Memory Express (NVMe®) share-storage arrays continue enhancing our ability to store and access more information faster across a much bigger network, customers of all sizes – enterprise, mid-market and SMBs – confront a common question: what is required to take advantage of this quantum leap forward in speed and capacity?

Of course, NVMe technology itself is not new, and is commonly found in laptops, servers and enterprise storage arrays. NVMe provides an efficient command set that is specific to memory-based storage, provides increased performance that is designed to run over PCIe 3.0 or PCIe 4.0 bus architectures, and — offering 64,000 command queues with 64,000 commands per queue — can provide much more scalability than other storage protocols.

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August 20th, 2020

Navigating Product Name Changes for Marvell Ethernet Adapters at HPE

By Todd Owens, Technical Marketing Manager, Marvell

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) recently updated its product naming protocol for the Ethernet adapters in its HPE ProLiant and HPE Apollo servers. Its new approach is to include the ASIC model vendor’s name in the HPE adapter’s product name. This commonsense approach eliminates the need for model number decoder rings on the part of Channel Partners and the HPE Field team and provides everyone with more visibility and clarity. This change also aligns more with the approach HPE has been taking with their “Open” adapters on HPE ProLiant Gen10 Plus servers. All of this is good news for everyone in the server sales ecosystem, including the end user. The products’ core SKU numbers remain the same, too, which is also good.

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May 1st, 2019

Revolutionizing Data Center Architectures for the New Era in Connected Intelligence

By George Hervey, Principal Architect, Marvell

Though established, mega-scale cloud data center architectures were adequately able to support global data demands for many years, there is a fundamental change taking place.  Emerging 5G, industrial automation, smart cities and autonomous cars are driving the need for data to be directly accessible at the network edge.   New architectures are needed in the data center to support these new requirements including reduced power consumption, low latency and smaller footprints, as well as composable infrastructure.

Composability provides a disaggregation of data storage resources to bring a more flexible and efficient platform for data center requirements to be met.  But it does, of course, need cutting-edge switch solutions to support it.  Capable of running at 12.8Tbps, the Marvell® Prestera® CX 8500 Ethernet switch portfolio has two key innovations that are set to redefine data center architectures: Forwarding Architecture using Slices of Terabit Ethernet Routers (FASTER) technology and Storage Aware Flow Engine (SAFE) technology.

With FASTER and SAFE technologies, the Marvell Prestera CX 8500 family can reduce overall network costs by more than 50%; lower power, space and latency; and determine exactly where congestion issues are occurring by providing complete per flow visibility.

View the video below to learn more about how Marvell Prestera CX 8500 devices represent a revolutionary approach to data center architectures.

 

 

August 3rd, 2018

IOPs and Latency

By Marvell, PR Team

Shared storage performance has significant impact on overall system performance. That’s why system administrators try to understand its performance and plan accordingly. Shared storage subsystems have three components: storage system software (host), storage network (switches and HBAs) and the storage array.

Storage performance can be measured at all three levels and aggregated to get to the subsystem performance. This can get quite complicated. Fortunately, storage performance can effectively be represented using two simple metrics: Input/Output operations per Second (IOPS) and Latency. Knowing these two values for a target workload, a user can optimize the performance of a storage system.

Let’s understand what these key factors are and how to use them to optimize of storage performance.

What is IOPS?
IOPS is a standard unit of measurement for the maximum number of reads and writes to a storage device for a given unit of time (e.g. seconds). IOPS represent the number of transactions that can be performed and not bytes of data. In order to calculate throughput, one would have to multiply the IOPS number by the block size used in the IO.

IOPS is a neutral measure of performance and can be used in a benchmark where two systems are compared using same block sizes and read/write mix.

What is a Latency?
Latency is the total time for completing a requested operation and the requestor receiving a response. Latency includes the time spent in all subsystems, and is a good indicator of congestion in the system.

IOPS is a neutral measure of performance and can be used in a benchmark where two systems are compared using same block sizes and read/write mix.

What is a Latency?
Latency is the total time for completing a requested operation and the requestor receiving a response. Latency includes the time spent in all subsystems, and is a good indicator of congestion in the system.

Find more about Marvell’s QLogic Fibre Channel adapter technology at:

https://www.marvell.com/fibre-channel-adapters-and-controllers/qlogic-fibre-channel-adapters/