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Posts Tagged ‘Security’

January 14th, 2021

What’s Next in System Integration and Packaging? New Approaches to Networking and Cloud Data Center Chip Design

By Wolfgang Sauter, Customer Solutions Architect - Packaging, Marvell

The continued evolution of 5G wireless infrastructure and high-performance networking is driving the semiconductor industry to unprecedented technological innovations, signaling the end of traditional scaling on Single-Chip Module (SCM) packaging. With the move to 5nm process technology and beyond, 50T Switches, 112G SerDes and other silicon design thresholds, it seems that we may have finally met the end of the road for Moore’s Law.1 The remarkable and stringent requirements coming down the pipe for next-generation wireless, compute and networking products have all created the need for more innovative approaches. So what comes next to keep up with these challenges? Novel partitioning concepts and integration at the package level are becoming game-changing strategies to address the many challenges facing these application spaces.

During the past two years, leaders in the industry have started to embrace these new approaches to modular design, partitioning and package integration. In this paper, we will look at what is driving the main application spaces and how packaging plays into next-generation system  architectures, especially as it relates to networking and cloud data center chip design.

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October 7th, 2020

Ethernet Advanced Features for Automotive Applications

By Amir Bar-Niv, VP of Marketing, Automotive Business Unit, Marvell

Ethernet standards comprise a long list of features and solutions that have been developed over the years to resolve real network needs as well as resolve security threats. Now, developers of Ethernet In-Vehicle-Networks (IVN) can easily balance between functionality and cost by choosing the specific features they would like to have in their car’s network.

The roots of Ethernet technology began in 1973, when Bob Metcalfe, a researcher at Xerox Research Center (who later founded 3COM), wrote a memo entitled “Alto Ethernet,” which described how to connect computers over short-distance copper cable. With the explosion of PC-based Local Area Networks (LAN) in businesses and corporations in the 1980s, the growth of client/server LAN architectures continued, and Ethernet started to become the connectivity technology of choice for these networks. However, the Ethernet advancement that made it the most successful networking technology ever was when standardization efforts began for it under the IEEE 802.3 group.

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